Anth's Computer Cave

Stirling vacuum, electronics

15th November, 2018

Updated 24th December, 2018


In the previous article we introduced our next robotic project, Stirling.

In this article we'll delve further into the existing electronics in the vacuum cleaner, and how we'll modify or replace these components to get our new smart robot working.

We'll update the article regularly as we get our heads around everything.

Use the buttons below to read all of the AAIMI Home Automation tutorials.

A Stirling robotic vacuum cleaner. Picture: Anthony Hartup.
Stirling in its current stupid form

Drive motor units

The drive motors from a Stirling robotic vacuum cleaner. Picture: Anthony Hartup.

As mentioned in the previous article, Striling uses self-contained units with gearboxes and drop-sensors built in. We've since opened one of these to see what's inside.

A rotary encoder and motor from a Stirling robotic vacuum cleaner. Picture: Anthony Hartup.
A rotary encoder and motor from a Stirling robotic vacuum cleaner.

As we suspected there is a rotary encoder attached to the back of the motor.

The black dome pictured above has 18 slots around its edge to give 20 degree increments. You can see the infrared (IR) receiver to the left of the dome.

It would usually takes some effort to figure the connections for this circuit board, but here we're in luck.

A rotary encoder and motor from a Stirling robotic vacuum cleaner. Picture: Anthony Hartup.

The 10-pin plugs connecting the drive units to the main board are clearly labeled!

Eight of the wires are in use. The two motor wires are m+ and m-, and the ground is obvious enough.

A rotary encoder and motor from a Stirling robotic vacuum cleaner. Picture: Anthony Hartup.

The A on one edge of the plug will be anode (+) for the IR encoder. I'm hoping this powers both the transmiter and receiver.

C generally stands for cathode (-), and in this case I suspect it may be the output (Emitter) from the encoder, because there doesn't seem to be any other output pin, K1 and K2 are the in/out for the drop-sensor.

Phase One

We're building Stirling in several phases. Phase one is purely to test our movement interfaces and GUI's.

A rotary encoder and motor from a Stirling robotic vacuum cleaner. Picture: Anthony Hartup.

For now all we've done is cut the wires from the m+ and m- tabs and extended them to my motor-controller.

The other pins from the motor unit are still plugged into the old main board, and the vacuum's old brain has no idea anything has change, and the LCD shows no errors. I did say it was stupid.

A Raspberry Pi and motor-controller connected to a Stirling robotic vacuum cleaner. Picture: Anthony Hartup.

The power comes from the battery via the power switch/charging board on the side of the vacuum. This connects directly to the motor-controller, and via a 5V USB adapter to the Pi.

The Raspberry Pi power connection from a Stirling robotic vacuum cleaner. Picture: Anthony Hartup.

Wired like this, the power switches on to the Pi and motors when I switch the main switch on the side. It will also switch on and stay on while the charger is plugged in.

The old brain's power-monitoring functions are still working, and it will power everything off if the battery gets too low. The LCD displays a three-bar battery status so we can see when it's getting low.

This is a really safe way to get phase one going, but it has it's drawbacks.

Firstly, the vacuum cleaner's brain must be powered on anytime the Raspberry Pi is running. This is obviously using a lot of unnecessary battery power, and all it's really doing is displaying the battery status.

Secondly, as mentioned above, the old brain powers off everything when the battery gets low. In other words it forces a hard shutdown on the Raspberry Pi.

In phase two we'll connect directly to the battery with our own power switch instead. During normal operation the vacuums own main board will powered off, and it will only switch on while charging. We'll also add an Arduino to monitor the battery so the Pi can shutdown before the vacuum's automatic cutout point.

That's all for today, check back soon.

Cheers

Anth

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